2017 Programs

Mar
1
Wed
Public Utilities Section State Bar Meeting 2017
Mar 1 @ 7:30 am – 2:00 pm

Public Utilities Section State Bar Meeting

4.5 CLEs available.

Draft Agenda

 

Breakfast Presentation (8th Floor Skyview Banquest Room):

7:30-8:00              Buffet Breakfast Served in Skyview Room, 8th Floor

8:00-8:45              Breakfast Program Special Guest Speaker:

                               Scott Hempling, Preside or Lead? The Attributes and Actions of Effective Regulators”

** A copy of his book by this title will be given to each Breakfast Presentation attendee. **

Scott Hempling

Scott Hempling

Main Program (Auditorium):

Listen to Audio Recording of Entire Program
- Click on menu button () to find individual presentations within audio recording

Cynthia Smith

Cynthia Smith

 

Alex Mahfood

Alex Mahfood

9:00-9:05              Welcome and Introduction

Alex Mahfood, Assistant General Counsel, Public Service Commission of Wisconsin

9:05-10:05           Annual update of activities at the Public Service Commission of Wisconsin

Cynthia Smith, General Counsel, Public Service Commission of Wisconsin Presentation

 

 

Lawrie Kobza

Lawrie Kobza

Anita Gallucci

Anita Gallucci

10:05-10:25         Municipal Law Updates

Anita Gallucci, Attorney, Boardman & Clark LLC   Presentation

10:25-10:35         Break

10:35-11:00         Water Law Updates

Lawrie Kobza, Attorney, Boardman & Clark LLC   Presentation

 

11:00-11:50         Presentation by Scott Hempling: Regional Resource Planning

11:50-12:00         Break

 

12:00-1:00           Panel Discussion: Issues in Regional Resource Planning

Lauren Azar

Lauren Azar

John Moore

John Moore

Moderated by Scott Hempling

Panelists

 

Bill Malcolm

Bill Malcolm

John Carr

John Carr

 

 

1:00-2:00              Networking Lunch

2:00                        Program Concludes

 

Program includes buffet breakfast, lunch and breaks, printed materials and, for those who attend Scott Hempling’s breakfast presentation, a copy of his book, Preside or Lead? The Attributes and Actions of Effective Regulators.”

fluno-center fluno-center-auditorium

 

Parking is available in the garage under Fluno and next door in UW Southeast Campus Ramp at Lake St. and W. Johnson St.

 

 

 

This program is hosted by the Wisconsin Public Utility Institute. WPUI is not responsible for the content of this program. Each presentation is the intellectual property of the listed author(s).

 

 

Mar
20
Mon
Washington Briefing
Mar 20 @ 8:00 am – 9:30 am

Mark Your Calendar!

March 20, 2017, 8:00-9:30 am

Washington Briefing

The Pyle Center, Madison WI

Pyle Center 2017 

michael-best-logo

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sponsored by Michael Best & Friedrich LLP
Hosted by the Wisconsin Public Utility Institute

Join Michael Best & Friedrich LLP for a special briefing from Washington D.C. about energy and environmental policy implementation within the new federal administration and Congress.

Michael Best & Friedrich LLP in Madison WI is pleased to welcome two Michael Best Strategies Partners from its Washington, D.C., office for this unique opportunity. Denise Bode and Tom Schreibel will bring their experience and expertise to bear in this informative session.  Following their presentation will be time for discussion about what the changes in EPA and DOE may mean for Wisconsin.

The presenters:Denise Bode

Denise Bode:  Attorney and partner with Michael Best Strategies, former chair of the Oklahoma Corporation Commission, former CEO of the American Wind Energy Association, and a former tax counsel to a member of the U.S. Senate Finance Committee. Denise was also the CEO of the American Clean Skies Foundation where she worked with the wind, solar and natural gas industries and the environmental community to explore options for assembling a portfolio approach to address generation that can provide clean energy and air in a carbon-challenged environment.

Tom Schreibel

Tom Schreibel:  Partner with Michael Best Strategies. Prior to joining Strategies, Tom served as vice president of government and industry affairs at Sheehan Family Companies, a national beverage distribution company. There he developed and executed strategies surrounding the company’s business practices, managed tracking of relevant policy activity for 15 state legislatures and Washington, D.C., and managed relationships and communication with industry leaders, legislators, and elected officials.

 

 Moderated by:

Eric Callisto

Eric Callisto:  Partner with Michael Best & Friedrich LLP. Eric is known for his extensive experience in energy and environmental matters, particularly the regulation of utilities at both the state and federal levels. Previously he served as chair of the Public Service Commission of Wisconsin, president of the Organization of MISO States (OMS), and was a member of the NARUC Board of Directors. He also served on the board of directors of the Wisconsin Public Utility Institute.

  

Registration Required:  www.wpui.org

Registration Fees:  Free to WPUI members, $35.00 for non-members.

Registration includes any printed materials and a welcome coffee.

Parking is available at the City of Madison State Street Campus Garage with entrances at 415 N. Lake St. and 430 N. Frances St.

 

This program is hosted by the Wisconsin Public Utility Institute.
WPUI is not responsible for the content of this program. Each presentation is the intellectual property of the listed author(s).
Jun
28
Wed
The Regulatory and Rates “Tango”
Jun 28 @ 8:15 am – 3:30 pm

 

 

 

The Regulatory and Rates “Tango”

0.6 CEUs

This session travels through history to understand the drivers and the outcomes of regulation/rates in Wisconsin, with a backdrop of what has happened nationally. We track how regulation translated into rates and vice versa and the ramifications, including a briefing on how cost of service changed over time.

 

8:00-8:15          Registration check-in and welcome coffee

8:15-8:45          The Foundations of Wisconsin’s Regulatory Role  –  The availability of heat, light, and water service are central to modern life. For this reason, an individual, business, or local government that provides one of these services to the public is deemed a “public utility” and is subject to a system of state regulation designed to ensure the availability of service and protect the interests of consumers, public utilities, and their investors.  Zach Ramirez, Staff Attorney, Wisconsin Legislative Council

8:45-9:30          Regulatory Intent:  From the First Oil Crisis Until Today  –  Covering the period from 1973 till 2016, this presentation looks at federal regulation which was mandated to the states for interpretation and implementation.  What was the driver for these “mandates?”  Nate Zolik, Attorney, Godfrey and Kahn

9:30-10:15        Utility Response to the “Tango”  –  Thrust into a new role, conserving their product, how did utility programs respond to new initiatives from the public and regulatory spheres of influence?

Panel Discussion

10:15-10:30      Break

10:30-11:45      Economics and Engineering in a new Partnership:  Cost of Service  –  Much has changed in cost of service modelling over the past 40 years as regulation and rates changed to new market conditions.  Larry Vogt, Director of Rates, Mississippi Power

11:45-12:30       Lunch

12:30-1:15         Minimum Distribution Charges   Minimum distribution charges have caught the attention of some regulators.  What is it and how can it help with cost/pricing issues in today’s market?  Larry Vogt

1:15-1:30            Break

1:30-2:45            Public Perception of the “Tango”  —  Presentation of program options that were designed to meet new regulatory guidance. What was the public expectation to these changes?  How did they perform?  What was the role of pilot programs and market incentives?

Panel Discussion:

  • Thomas Content, Executive Director, Citizens Utility Board of Wisconsin
  • Sarah Barry,  Executive Director, Customers First! Coalition

2:45-3:30            Challenge or Opportunity:  It Started With Conservation and Now Includes Renewable Load Growth  —   How have regulators and utilities responded to revenue erosion?  How successful have these options been?  How do these options fit with regulatory intent?   Dan Hansen, Vice President, Christensen Associates Energy Consulting     

3:30                      Adjourn

 

—————————————–

Note: The following programs have been designed as a series:

  • June 28, 2017 — The Regulatory and Rates “Tango”
  • July 21, 2017 — Regulatory Models, Version 2.0
  • Sept. 28, 2017 — Gas’s Pipeline to Sustainability
  • Oct. 26, 2017 — Powering a More Electric Economy

Registering for all four programs qualifies the registrant for a discounted registration fee.
If you would like to inquire about this discounted fee, please email Sara at slangmack@wisc.edu.

 

—————————————–

Your registration fee includes printed materials, breaks, and lunch.

Jul
21
Fri
Regulatory Models, Version 2.0
Jul 21 @ 8:30 am – 3:15 pm

 

Regulatory Models, Version 2.0

0.6 CEUs
This program takes a deep dive into Minnesota’s e21 Initiative for revising the social contract between regulators and the regulated.  We will explore the use of performance-based regulation in both retail and wholesale markets, and we will look at different regulatory and business models, as well as several case studies, that are being discussed in various midwest states, including Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois and others.

8:15-8:30          Registration check-in and welcome coffee

8:30-10:00        Minnesota’s e21 Initiative  — “The e21 Initiative aims to develop a more customer-centric and sustainable framework for utility regulation in Minnesota that better aligns how utilities earn revenue with public policy goals, new customer expectations, and the changing technology landscape. The initiative brings together key interests including utilities, consumer advocates, energy technology companies, other businesses, environmental and academic organizations, and government to accomplish this goal and enable Minnesota to continue to lead in shaping an electric system for the 21st century.”   http://www.betterenergy.org/projects/e21-initiative   Rolf Nordstrom, President and CEO, Great Plains Institute

10:00-10:15    Break

10:15-11:00     New Working Partnerships – What does the regulatory model look like that enables and encourages this kind of collaboration?

“Cities across the globe are using technology to not only improve services and infrastructure for citizens, but also address urban challenges – like energy and water usage, traffic, and waste.  They’re called smart cities – and Urbanova is one of the innovators in this movement, bringing together leaders in utility infrastructure, smart metering and communications, higher education, energy efficiency, population health, and urban planning to create a smart city technology proving ground in the heart of Spokane, Washington.” https://urbanova.org/#about   Kim Zentz, Director, Urbanova

11:00-11:30     Performance-based Regulation (PBR) from Telecom to the Energy Industry — Fifteen years ago, PBR, based on a telecom model, was kicked around as an option for the energy industry.  However, this model failed in application to the energy industry.  Now there is a resurgence of interest in this option.  Why now, and what challenges lie ahead?  Mark Meitzen, Vice President, Christensen Associates Energy Consulting

11:30-12:15         PBR in Retail Markets, Urbanova-style – Performance-based regulation asks, “What value do we want out of our utility system, and what are we willing to pay for it?”  In this session, we will review how PBR works and why it may be a workable model in the future for retail markets.  Michael O’Boyle, Power Sector Transformation Expert, Energy Innovation

12:15-1:00        Lunch

1:00-2:30          Compare and Contrast Other State Models

Questions that we will explore:

  1. What are the underlying principles that you are using in addressing model change?
  2. How will your plan provide value to all in the value chain?
  3. What have you tried that has worked, and what has not worked?

Ellen Nowak, Chair, Public Service Commission of Wisconsin; Sadzi Oliva,  Illinois Commerce Commission

 2:30-3:15              Models for Rural Communities

 3:15                        Adjourn

 

—————————————–

Note: The following programs have been designed as a series:

  • June 28, 2017 — The Regulatory and Rates “Tango”
  • July 21, 2017 — Regulatory Models, Version 2.0
  • Sept. 28, 2017 — Gas’s Pipeline to Sustainability
  • Oct. 26, 2017 — Powering a More Electric Economy

Registering for all four programs qualifies the registrant for a discounted registration fee.
If you would like to inquire about this discounted fee, please email Sara at slangmack@wisc.edu.
—————————————–

Your registration fee includes printed materials, breaks, and lunch.

 

Sep
28
Thu
Gas’s Pipeline to Sustainability
Sep 28 @ 8:30 am – 3:30 pm

 

Gas’s Pipeline to Sustainability

0.6 CEUs

8:15-8:30            Registration check-in and welcome coffee

8:30-10:30         Update on Gas Markets   Valerie Wood, President and CEO, Energy Solutions

10:30-10:45      Break

10:45-11:30       The Environmental Profile of Gas  To Be Determined

11:30-12:15       Lunch

12:15-12:45        Wisconsin’s Gas Network: Is it time to change our gas pipeline?   How fast can gas plants ramp up with current technology? Why are the uncoordinated timings of market networking causing micro and macro problems? How do systems constraints affect gas markets?   Jeff Hicken, Manager Gas Trading and Dispatch, Alliant Energy

12:45-1:15         Dispatching Gas with an Optimization Approach – This presents research conducted at the University of Wisconsin to tackle the problem of stranded power, power that does not have a market and how to improve gas dispatch with coordinating gas and electric markets.  Victor Zavala, Assistant Professor, College of Engineering, UW-Madison

1:15-2:15             Technology Update — From appliances to buildings.  Daniel LeFevers, Senior Program Manager, Gas Technology Institute, Invited

2:15-2:30             Break

2:30-3:00             End-users’ Concerns: Placing a bet on gas?  To Be Determined

3:00-3:30             MISO Perspective on Gas Needs   To Be Determined

3:30                      Adjourn

—————————————–

Note: The following programs have been designed as a series:

  • June 28, 2017 — The Regulatory and Rates “Tango”
  • July 21, 2017 — Regulatory Models, Version 2.0
  • Sept. 28, 2017 — Gas’s Pipeline to Sustainability
  • Oct. 26, 2017 — Powering a More Electric Economy

Registering for all four programs qualifies the registrant for a discounted registration fee.
If you would like to inquire about this discounted fee, please email Sara at slangmack@wisc.edu.

—————————————–

Your registration fee includes printed materials, breaks, and lunch.

Oct
9
Mon
Energy Utility Basics 2017
Oct 9 @ 8:00 am – Oct 13 @ 12:00 pm

Endorsed by NARUC 

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11.5 WI CLEs granted; CEUs will be given.

__________________________________

 Energy Utility Basics is an intensive course on the fundamental concepts critical to being conversant in today’s energy industry. Course content is updated yearly as technology, regulation, competition and markets evolve.  WPUI has proudly presented this exceptional course each fall since 1983.

Course Summary: Over four and a half days, participants will receive an introduction to the electric and natural gas industries, insights into regulatory decision-making, and an analysis of the current issues facing both industries.  The dedicated gas course begins Thursday at noon and continues until mid-day Friday

Benefits: Attendees will obtain practical knowledge of the operations and technology of the natural gas and electricity industries from extraction, whether from the ground or renewables, to the customer’s bill. Course registration covers a field trip to a natural gas power plant, daily lunches and breaks, printed course materials and UW-Madison CEU certification. CLE credits will be applied for.

Who Should Attend: The energy industry has undergone substantial changes – including changes in hiring practices. Twenty years ago, new utility staff would start out learning the ropes by working up through the ranks. In today’s fast-moving business environment, it is often advantageous to hire staff from other industries, bringing in outside talent that doesn’t yet have a working knowledge of the energy industry. Energy Utility Basics is intended for anyone working in the energy industry, including public interest groups, legislative staff, regulatory staff, state and local government personnel. The course is for energy professionals who want a better grasp of how all the technological, financial and political pieces of the energy puzzle fit together. Registration is open to the public

What others have said:

“I came in new to the industry wanting to learn about how energy is made, distributed, and transmitted. I am leaving with a better understanding of all that and more.”

“The good mix of speakers and audience made for an excellent atmosphere to understand a complex industry from all angles.”

“I wish I could have taken this course right away when I entered the utility industry.”

“I appreciate the care in progressively building on the modules.”

“Plenty of beneficial information, good speakers.”

“As someone with only a couple years of utility experience, this was a great foundation”

“Covered as many of the topics as possible in an entertaining and informative way – could have been very boring, but it wasn’t.  Nice work!”

“Excellent overview and well-planned program.”

“Delivery of complex information in an easy to digest manner.”

“I loved getting to see the operators and getting to touch and see how it all works at the power plant”

“Variety of speakers, all were knowledgeable and able to break down the subject matter for those with a limited knowledge of the industry.”

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Draft Agenda

October 9: Electricity  Industry Structure

Why a regulated monopoly? Who’s regulated, why and how: The Federal and State Perspective

  • Federal Roles, Rules, Spheres of Influence:  FERC and EPA
  • The Public Service Commission-Roles and Rules, Balance of Power
  • Transmission-The Overlooked Connection Until 1970
  • A Day in the Life of a Regional Transmission Organization:  A Primer
  • Utility Company Models-Presentations and Panel Discussion

October 10: Electricity  Industry Operations

From Heat to Electricity – How we make Electricity in the U.S.

  • Field Identification Guide to the Electric Industry
  • A Day in the Life of a Distribution Company
  • A Day in the Life of a Transmission Operator
  • Field Trip: Co-Generation Power Plant

October 11: Ratemaking for Electric and Gas Companies

What Drives Utility Stock Prices? What (Should) Keep Utility Execs Awake at Night?

  • Basics of Rate Setting
  • Dynamic Pricing and Demand Response
  • New Models for Pricing
  • Declining Revenues and Rate Response

October 12: Low to No Carbon Options

Work Done Without (or with a small) Carbon Footprint

  • Nuclear Future—The Base Load of the Future?
  • Balancing your Resource and Financial Portfolios
  • Where, How and Why Energy is Used in the US
  • Renewables Panel

October 13: The New/Old Kid on the Block: Gas

What Everyone Ought to Know About Gas

  • Providing Natural Gas Service-Wholesale
  • Providing Natural Gas Service-Retail
  • Gas Physical and Financial Markets

 

FEES:

Institute Member   $1,450.00
Non-Member  $2,250.00
Government (Non-Utility)    $700.00
Non-Profit, Member    $1,200.00
Non-Profit, Non-Member    $1,550.00

Your registration fee includes printed materials, meals/breaks and access to materials on our website post-program.

Accommodations: Graduate Madison

Room Rate:  $169 – $179

Deluxe Rooms includes amenities such as transportation to and from the Madison Airport, hot breakfast and more.

Parking is available for hotel guests.

Parking may be available in UW-Madison Lot 46 and in the City of Madison State Street Campus Garage at 415 N. Lake St.

Oct
26
Thu
Powering a More Electric Economy
Oct 26 @ 8:30 am – 3:30 pm

 

Powering a More Electric Economy

0.6 CEUs

8:15-8:30       Registration check-in and welcome coffee

8:30-9:00      Achieving Emissions Reductions with Electricity?  The effect of moving to electric vehicles, both personal and fleet.   Paul Meier, Director of Engineering, Blumont Engineering Solutions

 

—————————————–

Note: The following programs have been designed as a series:

  • June 28, 2017 — The Regulatory and Rates “Tango”
  • July 21, 2017 — Regulatory Models, Version 2.0
  • Sept. 28, 2017 — Gas’s Pipeline to Sustainability
  • Oct. 26, 2017 — Powering a More Electric Economy

Registering for all four programs qualifies the registrant for a discounted registration fee.
If you would like to inquire about this discounted fee, please email Sara at slangmack@wisc.edu.

 

—————————————–

Your registration fee includes printed materials, breaks, and lunch.